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Data from: Black spot infection in juvenile steelhead trout increases with stream temperature in northern California

Citation

Schaaf, Cody J.; Kelson, Suzanne J.; Nusslé, Sébastien C.; Carlson, Stephanie M. (2018), Data from: Black spot infection in juvenile steelhead trout increases with stream temperature in northern California, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.3878q

Abstract

Climate change will increase water temperature in rivers and streams that provide critical habitat for imperiled species. Warmer water temperatures will influence the intensity and nature of biotic interactions, including parasitism. To better understand the factors influencing a neascus-type parasitic infection known as black spot disease, we examined the relationship between infection rate in juvenile steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), abundance of another intermediate host (ramshorn snail, Planorbella trivolvis), and water temperature. We quantified infection patterns of trout at seven sites within the South Fork Eel River in northern California, visiting each site on three different occasions across the summer, and recording water temperature at each site. We also quantified infection patterns in trout captured from two tributaries to the South Fork Eel River. Overall, trout infection rates were highest in sites with the warmest temperatures. The abundance of ramshorn snails was positively related to both water temperature and black spot infection rates in juvenile trout. Both snail abundance and infection rates increased rapidly above a 23 °C daily maximum, suggesting a threshold effect at this temperature. We suggest that warmer temperatures are associated with environmental and biotic conditions that increase black spot disease prevalence in threatened steelhead trout. A comparison of our results with similar data collected from a more northern latitude suggests that salmonids in California may be warm-adapted in terms of their parasite susceptibility.

Usage Notes

Location

South Fork of the Eel River
California