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Data from: Adaptive functional divergence of the warm temperature acclimation-related protein (WAP65) in fishes and the ortholog Hemopexin (HPX) in mammals

Citation

Machado, João Paulo; Vasconcelos, Vítor; Antunes, Agostinho (2013), Data from: Adaptive functional divergence of the warm temperature acclimation-related protein (WAP65) in fishes and the ortholog Hemopexin (HPX) in mammals, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.39309

Abstract

Gene duplication is an important mechanism that leads to genetic novelty. Different, nonexclusive processes are likely involved, and many adaptive and nonadaptive events may contribute to the maintenance of duplicated genes. In some teleosts, a duplicate copy of the mammalian ortholog Hemopexin (HPX) is present, known as the warm temperature acclimation-related protein (WAP65). Both WAP65 and HPX have been associated with iron homeostasis due to the affinity to bind the toxic-free heme circulating in the blood stream. We have assessed the evolutionary dynamics of WAP65 and HPX genes to understand the adaptive role of positive selection at both nucleotide and amino acid level. Our results showed an asymmetrical evolution between the paralogs WAP65-1 and WAP65-2 after duplication with a slight acceleration of the evolutionary rate in WAP65-1, but not in WAP65-2, and few sites contributing to the functional distinction between the paralogs, whereas the majority of the protein remained under negative selection or relaxed negative selection. WAP65-1 is functionally more distinct from the ancestral protein function than WAP65-2. HPX is phylogenetically closer to WAP65-2 but even so functional divergence was detected between both proteins. In addition, HPX showed a fast rate of evolution when compared with both WAP65-1 and WAP65-2 genes. The assessed 3-dimensional (3-D) structure of WAP65-1 and WAP65-2 suggests that the functional differences detected are not causing noticeable structural changes in these proteins. However, such subtle changes between WAP65 paralogs may be important to understand the differential gene retention of both copies in 20 out of 30 teleosts species studied.

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