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Data from: Hybridization, natural selection and evolution of reproductive isolation: a 25-years survey of an artificial sympatric area between two mosquito sibling species of the Aedes mariae complex

Citation

Urbanelli, Sandra et al. (2014), Data from: Hybridization, natural selection and evolution of reproductive isolation: a 25-years survey of an artificial sympatric area between two mosquito sibling species of the Aedes mariae complex, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.39qf1

Abstract

Natural selection can act against maladaptive hybridization between co-occurring divergent populations leading to evolution of reproductive isolation among them. A critical unanswered question about this process that provides a basis for the theory of speciation by reinforcement, is whether natural selection can cause hybridization rates to evolve to zero. Here we investigated this issue in two sibling mosquitoes species, Aedes mariae and Ae. zammitii, that show post-mating reproductive isolation (F1 males sterile) and partial pre-mating isolation (different height of mating swarms) that could be reinforced by natural selection against hybridization. In 1986, we created an artificial sympatric area between the two species and sampled about 20,000 individuals over the following 25 years. Between 1986 to 2011, the composition of mating swarms and the hybridization rate between the two species were investigated across time in the sympatric area. Our results showed that Ae. mariae and Ae. zammitii have not completed reproductive isolation since their first contact in the artificial sympatric area. We have discussed the relative role of factors such as time of contact, gene flow, strength of natural selection, and biological mechanisms causing prezygotic isolation to explain the observed results.

Usage Notes

Location

Italy