Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Nutrient dominance governs the assembly of microbial communities in mixed nutrient environments

Citation

Estrela, Sylvie; Sanchez-Gorostiaga, Alicia; Vila, Jean; Sanchez, Alvaro (2021), Data from: Nutrient dominance governs the assembly of microbial communities in mixed nutrient environments, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.3bk3j9kj6

Abstract

A major open question in microbial community ecology is whether we can predict how the components of a diet collectively determine the taxonomic composition of microbial communities. Motivated by this challenge, we investigate whether communities assembled in pairs of nutrients can be predicted from those assembled in every single nutrient alone. We first find that although the null, naturally additive model generally predicts well the family-level community composition, there exist systematic deviations from the additive predictions that reflect generic patterns of nutrient dominance at the family-level. Pairs of more similar nutrients (e.g. two sugars) are on average more additive than pairs of more dissimilar nutrients (one sugar- one organic acid). Second, a simple dominance rule emerges: sugars generally dominate organic acids. These findings may be explained by family-level asymmetries in nutrient benefits. Overall, our results suggest that regularities in how nutrients interact may help predict communities responses to dietary changes.

Methods

This dataset contains 1) the taxonomy and relative abundance of each ESV in each community, and 2) the community biomass (OD620) of each community. The community composition was determined using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. DADA2 (version 1.6.0) was used to infer exact sequence variants (ESVs) from each sample, and the taxonomy was assigned using the SILVA reference database.