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Data from: Genetic composition of social groups influences male aggressive behaviour and fitness in natural genotypes of Drosophila melanogaster

Citation

Saltz, Julia B. (2013), Data from: Genetic composition of social groups influences male aggressive behaviour and fitness in natural genotypes of Drosophila melanogaster, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.3ds26

Abstract

Indirect genetic effects (IGEs) describe how an individual’s behaviour—which is influenced by his or her genotype—can affect the behaviours of interacting individuals. IGE research has focused on dyads. However, insights from social networks research, and other studies of group behaviour, suggest that dyadic interactions are affected by the behaviour of other individuals in the group. To extend IGE inferences to groups of three or more, IGEs must be considered from a group perspective. Here, I introduce the “focal interaction” approach to study IGEs in groups. I illustrate the utility of this approach by studying aggression among natural genotypes of Drosophila melanogaster. I chose two natural genotypes as “focal interactants”: the behavioural interaction between them was the “focal interaction.” One male from each focal interactant genotype was present in every group, and I varied the genotype of the third male—the “treatment male.” Genetic variation in the treatment male’s aggressive behaviour influenced the focal interaction, demonstrating that IGEs in groups are not a straightforward extension of IGEs measured in dyads. Further, the focal interaction influenced male mating success, illustrating the role of IGEs in behavioural evolution. These results represent the first manipulative evidence for IGEs at the group level.

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