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Data from: Variation in migration pattern, broodstock origin, and family productivity of coho salmon hatchery populations in British Columbia, Canada derived from parentage-based tagging.

Citation

Beacham, Terry D. et al. (2019), Data from: Variation in migration pattern, broodstock origin, and family productivity of coho salmon hatchery populations in British Columbia, Canada derived from parentage-based tagging., Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.3g1r4v3

Abstract

In salmonid parentage-based tagging (PBT) applications, entire hatchery broodstocks are genotyped, and subsequently progeny can be non-lethally sampled and assigned back to their parents using parentage analysis, thus identifying their hatchery of origin and brood year (i.e. age). Inter- and intra-population variability in migration patterns, life history traits, and fishery contributions can be determined from PBT analysis of samples derived from both fisheries and escapements (portion of a salmon population that does not get caught in fisheries and returns to its natal river to spawn). In the current study of southern British Columbia coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) populations, PBT analysis provided novel information on intra-population heterogeneity among males in the total number of progeny identified in fisheries and escapements, the proportion of progeny sampled from fisheries versus escapement, the proportion of two-year old progeny (jacks) produced, and the within-season return time of progeny. Fishery recoveries of coho salmon revealed heterogeneity in migration patterns among and within populations, with recoveries from north and central coast fisheries distinguishing ‘northern migrating’ from ‘resident’ populations. In northern-migrating populations, the mean distance between fishery captures of sibs (brothers and sisters) was significantly less than the mean distance between non-sibs, indicating the possible presence of intra-population genetic heterogeneity for migration pattern. Variation among populations in productivity and within populations in fish catchability indicated that population selection and broodstock management can be implemented to optimize harvest benefits from hatcheries. Application of PBT provided valuable information for assessment and management of hatchery-origin coho salmon in British Columbia.

Usage Notes

Location

Pacific Coast
southern British Columbia