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Data from: Long-term use benefits of personal frequency-modulated systems for speech in noise perception in patients with stroke with auditory processing deficits: a non-randomised controlled trial study

Citation

Koohi, Nehzat et al. (2017), Data from: Long-term use benefits of personal frequency-modulated systems for speech in noise perception in patients with stroke with auditory processing deficits: a non-randomised controlled trial study, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.3hg4k

Abstract

Objectives: Approximately one in five stroke survivors suffer from difficulties with speech reception in noise, despite normal audiometry. These deficits are treatable with personal Frequency Modulated systems (FMs). This study aimed to evaluate long term benefits in speech reception in noise, after daily 10 week use of personal FMs, in non-aphasic stroke patients with auditory processing deficits. Design: This was a prospective non randomised controlled trial study. Patients were allocated to an intervention care group or standard care subjects group according to their willingness to use the intervention or not. Setting: Tertiary care setting. Participants: Nine non-aphasic subjects with ischemic stroke, normal/near normal audiometry, and auditory processing deficits and with reported difficulties understanding speech in background noise were recruited in the subacute stroke stage (3-12 months after stroke). Interventions: Four patients (intervention care subjects) used the FMs in their daily life over 10 weeks. Five patients (standard care subjects) received standard care. Primary outcome measures: All subjects were tested at baseline (visit 1) and 10 weeks later (visit 2) on a sentences in noise test with the FMs (aided) and without the FMs (unaided). Results: Speech reception thresholds showed clinically and statistically significant improvements in intervention but not in standard care subjects at 10 weeks in both aided and unaided conditions. Conclusions: 10 week use of FM systems by adult stroke patients may lead to benefits in unaided speech in noise perception. Our findings may indicate auditory plasticity type changes and require further investigation.

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