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Data from: Migratory monarchs that encounter resident monarchs show life-history differences and higher rates of parasite infection

Citation

Satterfield, Dara A. et al. (2018), Data from: Migratory monarchs that encounter resident monarchs show life-history differences and higher rates of parasite infection, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.3jv3435

Abstract

Environmental change induces some wildlife populations to shift from migratory to resident behaviours. Newly formed resident populations could influence the health and behaviour of remaining migrants. We investigated migrant-resident interactions among monarch butterflies and consequences for life history and parasitism. Eastern North American monarchs migrate annually to Mexico, but some now breed year-round on exotic milkweed in the southern U.S. and experience high infection prevalence of protozoan parasites. Using stable isotopes (2H, 13C) and cardenolide profiles to estimate natal origins, we show that migrant and resident monarchs overlap during fall and spring migration. Migrants at sites with residents were 13 times more likely to have infections and three times more likely to be reproductive (outside normal breeding season) compared to other migrants. Exotic milkweed might either induce these states or attract migrants that are already infected or reproductive. Increased migrant-resident interactions could affect monarch parasitism, migratory success, and long-term conservation.

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB- 1406862; DEB- 1256115

Location

eastern North America