Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Impacts of selective logging on inbreeding and gene flow in two Amazonian timber species with contrasting ecological and reproductive characteristics

Citation

Vinson, Christina C.; Kanashiro, Milton; Harris, Stephen A.; Boshier, Dave H. (2014), Data from: Impacts of selective logging on inbreeding and gene flow in two Amazonian timber species with contrasting ecological and reproductive characteristics, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.3k506

Abstract

Selective logging in Brazil allows for the removal of up to 90% of trees above 50 cm diameter of a given timber species, independent of a species’ life history characteristics or how quickly it will recover. The genetic and demographic effects of selective logging on two Amazonian timber species (Dipteryx odorata Leguminosae, Jacaranda copaia Bignoniaceae) with contrasting ecological and reproductive characteristics were assessed in the same forest. Genetic diversity and gene flow were characterized by genotyping adults and seed sampled before and after logging, using hypervariable microsatellite markers. Overall, there were no short term genetic impacts on the J. copaia population, with commercial application of current Brazilian forest management regulations. In contrast, for D. odorata selective logging showed a range of genetic impacts, with a 10% loss of alleles, and reductions in siring by pollen from trees within the 546 ha study area (23% to 11%) and in the number of pollen donors per progeny array (2.8 to 1.6), illustrating the importance of the surrounding landscape. Asynchrony in flowering between D. odorata trees led to trees with no breeding partners, which could limit the species reproduction and regeneration under current regulations. The results are summarised with other published studies from the same site and the implications for forest management discussed. The different types and levels of impacts associated with each species support the idea that ecological and genetic information by species, ecological guild or reproductive group are essential in helping to derive sustainable logging guidelines for tropical forests.

Usage Notes

Location

Amazon Region
Tapajos National Forest