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Demographic history shapes genomic ancestry in hybrid zones

Citation

Frayer, Megan; Payseur, Bret (2022), Demographic history shapes genomic ancestry in hybrid zones, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.3tx95x6gk

Abstract

Demographic factors such as migration rate and population size can impede or facilitate speciation. In hybrid zones, reproductive boundaries between species are tested and demography mediates the opportunity for admixture between lineages that are partially isolated. Genomic ancestry is a powerful tool for revealing the history of admixed populations, but models and methods based on local ancestry are rarely applied to structured hybrid zones. To understand the effects of demography on ancestry in hybrids zones, we performed individual-based simulations under a stepping-stone model, treating migration rate, deme size, and hybrid zone age as parameters. We find that the number of ancestry junctions (the transition points between genomic regions with different ancestries), as well as heterogenicity (the genomic proportion heterozygous for ancestry), are often closely connected to demographic history. Reducing deme size reduces junction number and heterogenicity. Elevating migration increases heterogenicity, but migration affects junction number in more complex ways. We highlight the junction frequency spectrum as a novel and informative summary of ancestry that responds to demographic history. A substantial proportion of junctions are expected to fix when migration is limited or deme size is small, changing the shape of the spectrum. Our findings suggest that genomic patterns of ancestry could be used to infer demographic history in hybrid zones.

Methods

This dataset includes simulated genomic ancestry information.

Usage Notes

See README.txt for explanation of folders and files. 

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB1353737

National Institute of General Medical Sciences, Award: R01GM120051

National Institute of General Medical Sciences, Award: R35GM139412

National Institute of General Medical Sciences, Award: GM007133