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Data from: Effects of domestication on parr maturity, growth, and vulnerability to predation in Atlantic salmon

Citation

Debes, Paul V.; Hutchings, Jeffrey A. (2015), Data from: Effects of domestication on parr maturity, growth, and vulnerability to predation in Atlantic salmon, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.3v670

Abstract

Domestication can change fitness-related traits. We investigated domestication-induced changes in fitness-related traits in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) under naturally enriched laboratory conditions with and without threat of predation. Selection in two strains for rapid growth for 3 and 5 generations resulted in 2 and 3 times larger sizes of under-yearling parr relative to their wild ancestor. An initially larger size and ability to outgrow prey size more rapidly resulted in lower size-selective predation mortality for domesticated individuals. Growth under threat of predation was only reduced for wild individuals, suggesting that domestication co-selects for predator-related stress resistance. Size-adjusted male parr maturation probability was 34% in the wild strain, but significantly reduced to 10% and 7% after 3 and 5 generations of domestication, respectively. Together, freshwater-stage specific survival for individuals with a domesticated background relative to individuals with a wild genetic background might be higher in the presence of gape-limited predators preferring small individuals, but male reproductive success might be lower for domesticated individuals as their reproduction potential during the freshwater phase is reduced.

Usage Notes

Location

North Atlantic