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Data from: Inter- and Intraspecific Conflict between Parasites over Host Manipulation

Citation

Hafer, Nina; Milinski, Manfred (2016), Data from: Inter- and Intraspecific Conflict between Parasites over Host Manipulation, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.4061p

Abstract

Host manipulation is a common strategy by which parasites alter the behaviour of their host to enhance their own fitness. In nature, hosts are usually infected by multiple parasites. This can result in a conflict over host manipulation. Studies of such a conflict in experimentally infected hosts are rare. The cestode Schistocephalus solidus (S) and the nematode Camallanus lacustris (C) use copepods as their first intermediate host. They need to grow for some time inside this host before they are infective and ready to be trophically transmitted to their subsequent fish host. Accordingly, not yet infective parasites manipulate to suppress predation. Infective ones manipulate to enhance predation. We experimentally infected lab-bred copepods in a manner that resulted in copepods harbouring (1) an infective C plus a not yet infective C or S or (2) an infective S plus a not yet infective C. An infective C completely sabotaged host manipulation by any not yet infective parasite. An infective S partially reduced host manipulation by a not yet infective C. We hence show experimentally that a parasite can reduce or even sabotage host manipulation exerted by a parasite from a different species.

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