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Data from: Genomics of introgression in the Chinese horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus sinicus) revealed by transcriptome sequencing

Citation

Mao, Xiuguang; Tsagkogeorga, Georgia; Bailey, Sebastian E.; Rossiter, Stephen J. (2017), Data from: Genomics of introgression in the Chinese horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus sinicus) revealed by transcriptome sequencing, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.41793

Abstract

Recent genomic studies show that introgression can occur at a genome-wide scale among recently diverged lineages. However, introgression is difficult to distinguish from incomplete lineage sorting (ILS), and these processes are expected to occur together. Moreover, ncDNA introgression is less easily detected than mtDNA introgression, and as such its prevalence is less well understood. The Chinese horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus sinicus) occurs as three distinct forms on mainland China: the subspecies R. s. septentrionalis and two parapatric clades of R. s. sinicus (Central and East R. s. sinicus). Previous work suggested widespread mtDNA introgression between these subspecies; however, no ncDNA introgression was detected. In this study we sampled the coding genomes of all three forms of R. sinicus in order to perform a more sensitive test for ncDNA introgression against an expected background of ILS. We assembled 3548 nuclear protein-coding genes from these and three congeneric species, and built a high-confidence species tree using maximum likelihood and Bayesian concordance methods. Phylogenetic analysis suggested a mosaic genome for Central R. s. sinicus derived from R. s. septentrionalis and East R. s. sinicus. Nuclear DNA introgression between Central R. s. sinicus and R. s. septentrionalis was supported by three different tests, whereas ILS could not be ruled out completely. Our findings, in line with other recent results, indicate that recently diverged taxa undergo large-scale secondary introgression, and that this process likely operates alongside ILS to give rise to phylogenomic discordances or even mosaic genomes.

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