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Data from: Thermal resilience may shape population abundance of two sympatric congeneric Cotesia species (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

Citation

Mutamiswa, Reyard; Machekano, Honest; Chidawanyika, Frank; Nyamukondiwa, Casper (2019), Data from: Thermal resilience may shape population abundance of two sympatric congeneric Cotesia species (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.41hg1

Abstract

Basal and plasticity of thermal tolerance determine abundance, biogeographical patterns and activity of insects over spatial and temporal scales. For coexisting stemborer parasitoids, offering synergistic impact to the efficacy of biological control, mismatches in thermal tolerance may influence their ultimate impact in biocontrol programs under climate variability. Using laboratory-reared congeneric parasitoid species Cotesia sesamiae and Cotesia flavipes Cameron (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), we examined basal thermal tolerance to understand potential impact of climate variability on their survival and limits to activity. We measured upper- and lower -lethal temperatures (ULTs and LLTs), critical thermal limits [CTLs] (CTmin and CTmax), supercooling points (SCPs), chill-coma recovery time (CCRT) and heat knock-down time (HKDT) of adults. Results showed LLTs ranging -5 to 5°C and -15 to -1°C whilst ULTs ranged 35 to 42°C and 37 to 44°C for C. sesamiae and C. flavipes respectively. Cotesia flavipes had significantly higher heat tolerance (measured as CTmax), as well as cold tolerance (measured as CTmin) relative to C. sesamiae (P˂0.0001). While SCPs did not vary significantly (P>0.05), C. flavipes recovered significantly faster following chill-coma and had higher HKDT compared to C. sesamiae. The results suggest marked differential basal thermal tolerance responses between the two congeners, with C. flavipes having an advantage at both temperature extremes. Thus, under predicted climate change, the two species may differ in phenologies and biogeography with consequences on their efficacy as biological control agents. These results may assist in predicting spatio-temporal activity patterns which can be used in integrated pest management programs under climate variability.

Usage Notes

Location

Africa