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Data from: Prevalence of afebrile malaria and development of risk-scores for gradation of villages: a study from a hot-spot in Odisha

Citation

Panda, Bhuputra; Mohapatra, Mrinal Kar (2020), Data from: Prevalence of afebrile malaria and development of risk-scores for gradation of villages: a study from a hot-spot in Odisha, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.443s9p4

Abstract

Introduction: Malaria is a public health emergency in India and Odisha. The national malaria elimination programme aims to expedite early identification, treatment and follow-up of malaria cases in hot-spots through a robust health system, besides focusing on efficient vector control. This study, a result of mass screening conducted in a hot-spot in Odisha, aimed to assess prevalence, identify and estimate the risks and develop a management tool for malaria elimination. Methods: Through a cross-sectional study and using WHO recommended Rapid Diagnostic Test (RDT), 13221 individuals were screened. Information about age, gender, education and health practices were collected along with blood sample (5 µl) for malaria testing. Altitude, forestation, availability of a village health worker and distance from secondary health center were captured using panel technique. A multi-level poisson regression model was used to analyze association between risk factors and prevalence of malaria, and to estimate risk scores. Results: The prevalence of malaria was 5.8% and afebrile malaria accounted for 79 percent of all confirmed cases. Higher proportion of Pv infections were afebrile (81%). We found the prevalence to be 1.38 (1.1664 - 1.6457) times higher in villages where the Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA) didn’t stay; the risk increased by 1.38 (1.0428 - 1.8272) and 1.92 (1.4428 - 2.5764) times in mid- and high-altitude tertiles. With regard to forest coverage, villages falling under mid- and highest-tertiles were 2.01 times (1.6194 - 2.5129) and 2.03 times (1.5477 - 2.6809), respectively, more likely affected by malaria. Similarly, villages of mid tertile and lowest tertile of education had 1.73 times (1.3392 - 2.2586) and 2.50 times (2.009 - 3.1244) higher prevalence of malaria. Conclusion: Presence of ASHA worker in villages, altitude, forestation, and education emerged as principal predictors of malaria infection in the study area. An easy-to-use risk-scoring system for ranking villages based on these risk factors could facilitate resource prioritization for malaria elimination.

Usage Notes

Location

Pallahara
Odisha
India