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Data from: Sexually-selected male weapon is associated with lower inbreeding load but higher gender load in the bulb mite

Citation

Łukasiewicz, Aleksandra; Radwan, Jacek; Niśkiewicz, Małgorzata (2020), Data from: Sexually-selected male weapon is associated with lower inbreeding load but higher gender load in the bulb mite, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.44j0zpcbf

Abstract

Elaborate sexually selected ornaments and armaments are costly but increase the reproductive success of their bearers (usually males). It has been postulated that high-quality males can invest disproportionately more in such traits, making those traits honest signals of genetic quality. However, genes associated with such traits may have sexually antagonistic effects on fitness. Here, using a bulb mite Rhizoglyphus robini, a species in which a distinct dimorphism exists between males in the expression of a sexually selected weapon, we compare inbreeding and gender load between lines derived from armed fighters and unarmed scramblers. After four generations of sib-mating, inbreeding depression for female fitness was significantly lower in fighter-derived lines compared to scrambler-derived lines, suggesting that fighter males had significantly higher genetic quality. However, outbred females from fighter-derived lines had significantly lower fitness compared to outbred females from scrambler-derived lines, demonstrating significant gender load associated with the presence of a sexually selected male weapon. Our results imply that under outbreeding, genetic benefits of mating with bearers of elaborate sexually selected traits might be swamped by the costs of decreased fitness of female progeny due to sexually antagonistic effects.

Funding

Narodowym Centrum Nauki, Award: 2017/27/B/NZ8/00077

Narodowe Centrum Nauki, Award: 2019/32/T/NZ8/00112

European Social Fund, Award: POWER.03.02.00–00–I006/17