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Data from: Background selection and FST: consequences for detecting local adaptation

Citation

Matthey-Doret, Remi; Whitlock, Michael C. (2019), Data from: Background selection and FST: consequences for detecting local adaptation, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.44vr58d

Abstract

Background selection is a process whereby recurrent deleterious mutations cause a decrease in the effective population size and genetic diversity at linked loci. Several authors have suggested that variation in the intensity of background selection could cause variation in FST across the genome, which could confound signals of local adaptation in genome scans. We performed realistic simulations of DNA sequences, using recombination maps from humans and sticklebacks, to investigate how variation in the intensity of background selection affects FST and other statistics of population differentiation in sexual, outcrossing species. We show that, in populations connected by gene flow, Weir & Cockerham's (1984) estimator of FST is largely insensitive to locus-to-locus variation in the intensity of background selection. Unlike FST, however, dXY is negatively correlated with background selection. Moreover, background selection does not greatly affect the false positive rate in FST outlier studies in populations connected by gene flow. Overall, our study indicates that background selection will not greatly interfere with finding the variants responsible for local adaptation.

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