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Data from: Effect of H. pylori infection on cytokine profiles and oxidative balance in subjects with chronic alcohol ingestion

Citation

Qu, Baoge et al. (2016), Data from: Effect of H. pylori infection on cytokine profiles and oxidative balance in subjects with chronic alcohol ingestion, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.45ds3

Abstract

Different amounts of ingested alcohol can have distinct effects on the human body. However, there is limited research on chronic alcohol consumption with Helicobacter pylori infection. We sought to investigate the relationship between the cytokine profile, oxidative balance and H. pylori infection in subjects with chronic alcohol consumption. A total of 142 subjects were divided into three groups: 59 subjects with chronic alcohol ingestion and H. pylori infection (group A); 53 subjects with chronic alcohol ingestion without H. pylori infection (group B); and 30 control subjects (group C). The serum levels of CagA, interleukin (IL)-10, E-selectin, TNF-α, malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that the ages and serum H. pylori CagA levels among the three groups, as well as both the mean drinking age and the mean daily alcohol consumption between groups A and B, were matched and comparable. Comparing the BMIs among the three groups, the BMI differences were found to be statistically significant (F=3.921, P<0.05). Compared with group C, the BMIs in groups A and B were significantly higher (P<0.001 and P<0.01, respectively); however, the BMI differences between group A and group B were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Additionally, no differences in the serum CagA levels were found in comparisons among the groups (all P>0.05). The serum IL-10 and E-selectin levels in group A were significantly lower than those in group B (serum IL-10: P<0.05; E-selectin: P<0.05). The serum IL-10 in group A was significantly higher than that in group C (P<0.01); the serum E-selectin levels in group A did not significantly differ compared with those in group C (P>0.05). Furthermore, the serum IL-10 and E-selectin levels in group B were significantly higher than those in group C (serum IL-10: P<0.001; E-selectin: P<0.05); however, the serum TNF-α levels did not differ among groups (all P>0.05). Although the serum levels of MDA and SOD in groups A and B were slightly lower than those in group C, there were no significant differences among groups (all P>0.05). In conclusion, we believe that H. pylori infection might cause a significant inhibition of certain cytokine profiles in subjects with chronic alcohol ingestion. Moreover, chronically ingested alcohol may exert an adjusted inflammatory effect, but there was no association between H. pylori infection, chronic alcohol consumption and oxidative balance.

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