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Data from: Different genetic structures revealed resident populations of a specialist parasitoid wasp in contrast to its migratory host

Citation

Wei, Shu-Jun et al. (2018), Data from: Different genetic structures revealed resident populations of a specialist parasitoid wasp in contrast to its migratory host, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.45fm6

Abstract

Genetic comparisons of parasitoids and their hosts are expected to reflect ecological and evolutionary processes that influence the interactions between species. The parasitoid wasp, Cotesia vestalis, and its host diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella, provide opportunities to test whether the specialist natural enemy migrates seasonally with its host or occurs as resident population. We genotyped 17 microsatellite loci and two mitochondrial genes for 158 female adults of C. vestalis collected from 12 geographical populations, as well as nine microsatellite loci for 127 DBM larvae from six separate sites. The samplings covered both the likely source (southern) and immigrant (northern) areas of DBM from China. Populations of C. vestalis fell into three groups, pointing to isolation in northwestern and southwestern China and strong genetic differentiation of these populations from others in central and eastern China. In contrast, DBM showed much weaker genetic differentiation and high rates of gene flow. TESS analysis identified the immigrant populations of DBM as showing admixture in northern China. Genetic disconnect between C. vestalis and its host suggests that the parasitoid did not migrate yearly with its host but likely consisted of resident populations in places where its host could not survive in winter.

Usage Notes

Location

China