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Data from: Searching for the bull's-eye: agents and targets of selection vary among geographically disparate cyanogenesis clines in white clover (Trifolium repens L.)

Citation

Kooyers, Nicholas J.; Olsen, Kenneth M. (2013), Data from: Searching for the bull's-eye: agents and targets of selection vary among geographically disparate cyanogenesis clines in white clover (Trifolium repens L.), Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.49k4d

Abstract

The recurrent evolution of adaptive clines within a species can be used to elucidate the selective factors and genetic responses that underlie adaptation. White clover is polymorphic for cyanogenesis (HCN release with tissue damage), and climate-associated cyanogenesis clines have evolved throughout the native and introduced species range. This polymorphism arises through two independently segregating Mendelian polymorphisms for the presence/absence of two required components: cyanogenic glucosides and their hydrolyzing enzyme linamarase. Cyanogenesis is commonly thought to function in herbivore defense; however, the individual cyanogenic components may also serve other physiological functions. To test whether cyanogenesis clines have evolved in response to the same selective pressures acting on the same genetic targets, we examined cyanogenesis cline shape and its environmental correlates in three world regions: southern New Zealand, the central U.S., and the U.S. Pacific Northwest. For some regional comparisons, cline shapes are remarkably similar despite large differences in the spatial scales over which clines occur (40- 1,600 km). However, we also find evidence for major differences in both the agents and targets of selection among the sampled clines. Variation in cyanogenesis frequency is best predicted using a combination of minimum winter temperature and aridity variables. Together our results provide evidence that recurrent adaptive clines do not necessarily reflect shared adaptive processes.

Usage Notes

Location

South Island New Zealand
Central U.S.
Pacific Northwest