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Data from: Association between attitudes of stigma toward mental illness and attitudes toward adoption of evidence-based practice within health care providers in Bahrain

Citation

Al Saif, Feras; Al Shakhoori, Hussain; Nooh, Suad; Jahrami, Haitham (2020), Data from: Association between attitudes of stigma toward mental illness and attitudes toward adoption of evidence-based practice within health care providers in Bahrain, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.4b6v2f0

Abstract

The health care system is one of the key areas where people with mental illnesses could experience stigma. Clinicians can hold stigma attitudes during their interactions with patients with mental illness. To improve the quality of mental health services and primary care, evidence-based practices should be disseminated and implemented. In this study, we evaluated the attitudes of health care providers in Bahrain toward people with mental illness and adoption of evidence-based practice using the Opening Minds Stigma Scale for Healthcare Providers (OMS-HC) and Evidence-Based Practice Attitude Scale (EBPAS). We conducted a cross-sectional study across 12 primary health care centers and a psychiatric hospital (the country’s main mental health care facility). A self-report questionnaire was distributed among all health care providers. A total of 547 health care providers participated, with 274 from mental health services and 273 from primary care services. Results of the OMS-HC indicated differences between both main groups and subgroups. Regression model analysis reported significant outcomes. There was no statistical difference found between both groups in EBPAS scores. A weak but statistically significant negative association was reported between both scales. Participants showed varying stigma attitudes across different working environments, with less stigma shown in mental health services than in primary care services. Providers who were more open to adopting evidence-based practices showed less stigma toward people with mental illness. Comparing our findings with previous research showed that health care providers in Bahrain hold more stigma attitudes than other groups studied. We hope that this study serves as an initial step toward future campaigns against the stigma of mental illness in Bahrain and across the region.