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Data from: Wasp waist and flight: convergent evolution in wasps reveals a link between wings and body shapes

Citation

Perrard, Adrien (2019), Data from: Wasp waist and flight: convergent evolution in wasps reveals a link between wings and body shapes, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.4f30fn5

Abstract

Insect flight is made possible by different morphological structures: wings produce the lift, the thorax drives the wings’ movements and the abdomen serves as a secondary control device. As such, the covariation of these structures could reflect functional constraints related to flight performances. This study examines evolutionary convergences in wasp body shapes to provide the first evidence for morphological integration between insect wings, thorax and abdomen. Shapes of the fore- and hindwings, thorax and petiole (connecting abdomen and thorax) of 22 Vespidae species were analyzed using computerized tomography and geometric morphometrics. Results show a clear relationship between petiole and wings or thorax shapes, but not between wings and thorax. Wasps with elongated bodies have pointed wings, both features thought to improve flight maneuverability. In contrast, stouter species have rounded wings, which may allow for higher flight speeds. These integration patterns suggest that multiple selective regimes on flight performance, some of them biased towards maneuverability or maximal speed, drove the morphological diversity in Vespidae. The results also suggest that wing shapes evolved under constraints related to the body type they have to lift. The abdomen morphology is thus another factor to take into account to understand the flight performance of insects.

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