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Data from: Role of ambient pressure in self-heating torrefaction of dairy cattle manure

Citation

Itoh, Takanori et al. (2020), Data from: Role of ambient pressure in self-heating torrefaction of dairy cattle manure, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.4j0zpc87r

Abstract

This paper describes the role of ambient pressure in self-heating torrefaction of livestock manure. We explored the initiating temperatures required to cause self-heating of wet dairy cattle manure at different ambient pressures (0.1, 0.4, 0.7, and 1.0 MPa). Then, we conducted proximate, elemental, and calorific analyses of biochar torrefied at 210, 250, and 290 °C. The results showed that self-heating was induced at 155 °C or higher for 0.1 MPa and at 115 °C or lower for 0.4 MPa or higher. The decrease of the initiating temperature at elevated pressure was due not only to more oxygen, but also to the retention of moisture that can promote chemical oxidation of manure. Biochar yields decreased with increasing torrefaction temperature and pressure, and the yield difference at 0.1 and 1.0 MPa was more substantial at lower temperatures: a 29.8, 16.4, and 9.4% difference at 210, 250, and 290 °C, respectively. Proximate and elemental analyses showed that elevated pressure promotes devolatilization, deoxygenation, and coalification compared to atmospheric pressure; its impact, however, was less at higher temperatures as the torrefaction temperature became more dominant. Calorific analysis revealed that elevated pressure can increase the higher heating value (HHV) on a dry and ash-free basis at 210 °C because of the increase in carbon content, but its impact is limited at 250 and 290 °C. Meanwhile, the HHV on a dry basis exhibited the opposite trend due primarily to an enlargement of ash content. The present study revealed that ambient pressure considerably affects the initiating temperature of self-heating and the chemical properties of biochar at a low torrefaction temperature.

Usage Notes

1. R statistical software is required for running our code.

2. Our R scripts have been developed under R statistical software (version 3.6.2 for Mac OS X; https://www.r-project.org).

3. The carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen contents are expressed on a dry and ash-free (daf) basis. You can convert it to a dry basis (db) using the following equation; C[%db] = C[%daf] * (1-Ash[%db]/100).

Funding

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Award: JP26292130

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Award: JP17J00272

Tanigurogumi Corporation

Tanigurogumi Corporation