Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Data from: Seasonal polyphenism of Spotted-wing Drosophila is affected by variation in local abiotic conditions within its invaded range, likely influencing survival and regional population dynamics

Citation

Stockton, Dara et al. (2021), Data from: Data from: Seasonal polyphenism of Spotted-wing Drosophila is affected by variation in local abiotic conditions within its invaded range, likely influencing survival and regional population dynamics, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.4j0zpc884

Abstract

1. Overwintering Drosophila often display adaptive phenotypic differences beneficial for survival at low temperatures. However, it is unclear which morphological traits are the best estimators of abiotic conditions, how those traits are correlated with functional outcomes in cold tolerance, and whether there are regional differences in trait expression.

2. We used a combination of controlled laboratory assays, and collaborative field collections of invasive Drosophila suzukii in different areas of the United States, to study the factors affecting phenotype variability of this temperate fruit pest now found globally.

3. Lab studies demonstrated that WM trait expression is continuous within the developmental temperature niche of this species (10-25 °C) and that wing length and abdominal melanization are the best predictors of the larval abiotic environment.

4. However, the duration and timing of cold exposure also produced significant variation in development time, morphology, and survival at cold temperatures. During a stress test assay conducted at -5 °C, although cold tolerance was greater among WM flies, long-term exposure to cold temperatures as adults significantly improved SM survival, indicating that these traits are not controlled by a single mechanism.

5. Among wild D. suzukii populations, we found that regional variation in abiotic conditions differentially affects the expression of external morphological traits, although further research is needed to determine whether these differences are genetic or environmental in origin and whether thermal susceptibility thresholds differ among populations within its invaded range.

Methods

These data were collated from several different experiments presented in Stockton et al. 2020, Ecology and Evolution. The format shown is what was used during statistical analysis using R software. No further formatting changes were made to the data during analysis.