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Data from: Experimental hybridization in allopatric species of the Drosophila repleta group (Diptera, Drosophilidae): implications in the mode of speciation

Citation

Colines, Betina; Soto, Ignacio M.; de Panis, Diego N.; Padro, Julian (2017), Data from: Experimental hybridization in allopatric species of the Drosophila repleta group (Diptera, Drosophilidae): implications in the mode of speciation, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.4p800

Abstract

The Pleistocene refugia theory proposes that recurrent expansions and contractions of xerophytic vegetation over climate change periods affected the evolution of cactophilic Drosophila in South American continent. The resulting demographic fluctuations linked to the available patches of vegetation should have been prone to bottlenecks and founder events, affecting the fate of gene pool dynamics. However, these events also promoted the diversification of cacti, creating an ecological opportunity for host specialization. We tested the hypothesis of ecological speciation in the D. buzzatii group. We assessed adaptive footprints and examined the genetic architecture of fitness related traits in the sibling allopatric species D. koepferae and D. antonietae. Overall our results are in line with the idea that these species evolved under different ecological scenarios. Joint-scaling analysis comparing both species and their hybrids revealed that additive genetic variance was the major contributor to phenotypic divergence, but dominance, epistasis and maternal effects were also important factors. Correlation analysis among functionally-related traits suggested divergent selection on phenotypic integration associated with fitness. These findings support the hypothesis of adaptive evolution driving the phylogenetic radiation of the group through independent events of host shifts to chemically complex columnar cacti.

Usage Notes

Location

Argentina