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When waterholes get busy, rare interactions thrive: Photographic evidence of a jaguar (Panthera onca) killing an ocelot (Leopardus pardalis)

Citation

Perera-Romero, Lucy; García-Anleu, Rony; McNab, Roan; Thornton, Daniel (2020), When waterholes get busy, rare interactions thrive: Photographic evidence of a jaguar (Panthera onca) killing an ocelot (Leopardus pardalis), Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.4tmpg4f87

Abstract

During a camera trap survey conducted in Guatemala in the 2019 dry season, we documented a jaguar killing an ocelot at a waterhole with high mammal activity. During severe droughts, the probability of aggressive interactions between carnivores might increase when fixed, valuable resources such as water cannot be easily partitioned.

Methods

Images collected during a camera-trapping study conducted in the Maya Biosphere Reserve, northern Guatemala.

Usage Notes

Video of the complete photographic sequence of a jaguar (Panthera onca) attacking and apparently killing an ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) at a waterhole in northern Guatemala in March of 2019. Please note the camera's programming is erroneous, being the correct date 2019 as referred to in the main text. Photographic credit: Mammal Spatial Ecology and Conservation Lab at Washington State University, Wildlife Conservation Society - Guatemala, Centro de Estudios Conservacionistas (CECON), and Consejo Nacional de Áreas Protegidas (CONAP).

Funding

Rufford Small Grants

Coypu Foundation

Christensen Conservation Leaders Scholarship -Wildlife Conservation Society Graduate Research Fellowship

USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

Rufford Small Grants

USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture