Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Genetic subdivision and variation in selfing rates among Central American populations of the mangrove rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus

Citation

Tatarenkov, Andrey et al. (2015), Data from: Genetic subdivision and variation in selfing rates among Central American populations of the mangrove rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.528nm

Abstract

We used 32 polymorphic microsatellite loci to investigate how a mixed-mating system affects population genetic structure in Central American populations (N = 243 individuals) of the killifish Kryptolebias marmoratus (mangrove rivulus), 1 of 2 of the world’s only known self-fertilizing vertebrates. Results were also compared with previous microsatellite surveys of Floridian populations of this species. For several populations in Belize and Honduras, population structure and genetic differentiation were pronounced and higher than in Florida, even though the opposite trend was expected because populations in the latter region were presumably smaller and highly selfing. The deduced frequency of selfing (s) ranged from s = 0.39–0.99 across geographic locales in Central America. This heterogeneity in selfing rates was in stark contrast to Florida, where s > 0.9. The frequency of outcrossing in a population (t = 1 − s) was tenuously correlated with local frequencies of males, suggesting that males are one of many factors influencing outcrossing. Observed distributions of individual heterozygosity showed good agreement with expected distributions under an equilibrium mixed-mating model, indicating that rates of selfing remained relatively constant over many generations. Overall, our results demonstrate the profound consequences of a mixed-mating system for the genetic architecture of a hermaphroditic vertebrate.

Usage Notes

Location

Honduras
Belize