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Data from: Direct and indirect effect of cannibalism and intraguild predation in the two sibling Harmonia ladybird beetles

Citation

Osawa, Naoya; Rasekh, Arash (2020), Data from: Direct and indirect effect of cannibalism and intraguild predation in the two sibling Harmonia ladybird beetles, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.547d7wm59

Abstract

In this study, we focused on the direct (i.e. predation) and indirect (i.e. potential threat from coexisting with a larger individual) effects of cannibalism and intraguild predation (IGP) during larval stages of two sibling ladybird beetles. These effects play an important role in the coexistence of the generalist–common Harmonia axyridis and specialist–rare H. yedoensis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). Direct predation effect of cannibalism and IGP were asymmetric in the two sibling ladybird beetles; the fourth instar larvae of H. axyridis were better intraguild predators than cannibals, while the reverse was true in the larvae of H. yedoensis. Neither cannibalism nor IGP significantly affected female body weight in either species. Larval H. axyridis surviving exposure to cannibalism or IGP had a reduced number of ovarioles as adults, whereas adult H. yedoensis ovarioles were not affected. For the indirect effects, longer developmental times in males and females and a lower total number of ovarioles in females were detected in H. axyridis. In H. yedoensis, shorter developmental time of males, lighter adult weight and fewer total ovarioles in females were observed. Olfactometer choice experiments clarified that the fourth instar larvae of H. axyridis avoided the first instar conspecific larvae, while those of H. yedoensis were attracted to the odours from H. axyridis and conspecifics. Thus, H. axyridis has an avoidance mechanism only for cannibalism but not for IGP, whereas H. yedoensis does not have any avoidance mechanism. These different behaviours in the direct and indirect effects of cannibalism and IGP observed in the laboratory may play important roles in the coexistence of generalist–common H. axyridis and specialist–rare H. yedoensis in natural conditions, compensating for the large handicap of H. yedoensis at reproductive interference from H. axyridis.

Methods

We focused on the direct and indirect effects of cannibalism and intraguild predation (IGP) during larval stages of two sibling ladybird beetles Harmonia axyridis and H. yedoensis.

Funding

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Award: L-15555, 20405047, 24255013, 18F18396