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Data from: Males increase call frequency, not intensity, in response to noise, revealing no Lombard effect in the little torrent frog

Citation

Zhao, Longhui et al. (2018), Data from: Males increase call frequency, not intensity, in response to noise, revealing no Lombard effect in the little torrent frog, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.54fp3j1

Abstract

Noise is one of the main factors that can influence the processes of sound communication across a wide range of animal groups. Although the effects of ambient noise on animal communication, including anthropogenic noise, have received increasing attention, few studies have examined changes in the fine structure of acoustic signals produced by vocalizing species in constantly noisy environments. Here, we used natural recordings to determine the associations between stream noise and call parameters in the little torrent frog (Amolops torrentis). We also used playbacks of stream noise recorded in natural habitats and playbacks of white noise to examine how male vocal signals change with increasing noise levels. The results show that noise intensity has a significant effect on male call frequency, but not on call amplitude or other call characteristics. Based on this evidence, we suggest that in streamside species stream noise drives males to alter call frequency and call as loudly as possible in order to improve discriminability. These findings provide insights into the role played by ecological selection in the evolution of noise‐dependent anuran vocal plasticity

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