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Data from: Diversification patterns in the CES clade (Brassicaceae tribes Cremolobeae, Eudemeae, Schizopetaleae) in Andean South America

Citation

Salariato, Diego Leonel et al. (2017), Data from: Diversification patterns in the CES clade (Brassicaceae tribes Cremolobeae, Eudemeae, Schizopetaleae) in Andean South America, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.57gj4

Abstract

Dated molecular phylogenetic trees show that the Andean uplift had a major impact on South American biodiversity. For many Andean groups, accelerated diversification (radiation) has been documented. However, not all Andean lineages appear to have diversified following the model of rapid radiation, particularly in the central and southern Andes. Here, we investigated the diversification patterns for the largest South American-endemic lineage of Brassicaceae, composed of tribes Cremolobeae, Eudemeae and Schizopetaleae (CES clade). Species of this group inhabit nearly all Andean biomes and adjacent areas including the Atacama–Sechura desert, the Chilean Matorral and the Patagonian Steppe. First, we studied diversification times and historical biogeography of the CES clade. Second, we analysed diversification rates through time, lineages and associated life forms. Results demonstrate that early diversification of the CES clade occurred in the early to mid-Miocene (c. 12–19 Mya) and involved the central Andes, the southern Andes and the Patagonian Steppe, and the Atacama–Sechura desert. The Chilean Matorral and northern Andes were colonized subsequently in the early Pliocene (4–5 Mya). Diversification of the CES clade was recovered as a gradual process without any evidence for rate shifts or rapid radiation, in contrast to many other Andean groups analysed so far. Diversification time/rates and biogeographical patterns obtained for the CES clade are discussed and compared with patterns and conclusions reported for other Andean plant lineages.

Usage Notes

Location

South America
Ecuador
Colombia
Andes
Argentina
Chile
Bolivia
Peru
Patagonian Steppe
Atacama desert