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Data from: Host resistance and pathogen aggressiveness are key determinants of coinfection in the wild

Citation

Susi, Hanna; Laine, Anna-Liisa (2017), Data from: Host resistance and pathogen aggressiveness are key determinants of coinfection in the wild, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.5h9s7

Abstract

Coinfection, whereby the same host is infected by more than one pathogen strain, may favor faster host exploitation rates as strains compete for the same limited resources. Hence, coinfection is expected to have major consequences for pathogen evolution, virulence and epidemiology. Theory predicts genetic variation in host resistance and pathogen infectivity to play a key role in how coinfections are formed. The limited number of studies available have demonstrated coinfection to be a common phenomenon, but little is known about how coinfection varies in space, and what its determinants are. Our aim is to understand how variation in host resistance and pathogen infectivity and aggressiveness contribute to how coinfections are formed in the interaction between fungal pathogen Podosphaera plantaginis and Plantago lanceolata. Our phenotyping study reveals that more aggressive strains are more likely to form coinfections than less aggressive strains in the natural populations. In the natural populations most of the variation in coinfection is found at the individual plant level, and results from a common garden study confirm the prevalence of coinfection to vary significantly among host genotypes. These results show that genetic variation in both the host and pathogen populations are key determinants of coinfection in the wild.

Usage Notes

Location

Åland Islands