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Data from: Shelf life and quality of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) fruits as affected by neem leaf extract dipping and beeswax coating

Citation

Shonte, Tigist Tadesse; Zewdie, Biruk; Woldetsadik, Kebede (2022), Data from: Shelf life and quality of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) fruits as affected by neem leaf extract dipping and beeswax coating, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.5mkkwh772

Abstract

The data was generated to investigate the effect of Beeswax (BW) coating and Neem leaf extract (NLE) dipping on the shelf life and quality of tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) over a storage period of 36 days. A factorial combination of four levels of Neem plant extract (control, 15%, 20% and 25%) and four levels of beeswax coating (control, 3%, 6% and 9%) storage treatments with three replications were applied on fully matured green tomatoes in the study. The treatments were arranged in a randomized complete block design. The average storage room air temperature and relative humidity varied from 15.2 ºC to 20.4 ºC and 55.53% to 69.46% RH during 36 days of storage period at Haramaya University from February to April 2020. Data were recorded on 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, 32, and 36 days after storage. Data on physiological loss in weight, chemical compositions (total soluble solids, pH, titratable acidity, and ascorbic acid), decay (%), percentage marketability, and shelf life were assessed at an interval of four days during 36 days of storage period under ambient conditions.

Methods

Sample preparation: Fully mature green tomato, Shanty PM fresh variety, was harvested from Erer Woreda, Eastern Harerge in Ethiopia. Fruits were selected based on uniformity in size, maturity (mature green) and absence of external injuries. The fruits were cleaned properly with distilled water to remove dust, dirt, mud, filth, etc.

Preparation and concentration of Neem leaf extract: Neem (Azadirachta indica) leaves were collected from Dire Dewa (Tonny Farm). Fresh Neem leaves were collected from middle part the tree and then air dried. After drying the plant material was ground with mechanical grinder to prepare a fine powder. Then, 200 g of the powder was soaked in 1000 mL of distilled water for 6 hrs. and then passed through muslin cloth. The filtrate was used as a stock solution (100%) for preparing NLE coating solution of 15%, 20% and 25% by further dilution.

Preparation and concentration beeswax emulsion: Beeswax emulsion concentration of 3%, 6%, and 9% was prepared by heating 30 g, 60 g, and 90 g of beeswax in a 2 L container and melted at 70 ℃, the contents were heated continuously to attain a temperature of 80 ○C to 90 ○C. Oleic acid (160 mL) was added to the melted wax with a constant stirring. Then, 840 mL of distilled water (which was pre-heated at the same temperature of 80 ○C to 90 ○C was added to the mixture slowly with continued stirring for five minutes and air dried.

Experimental design and treatment of tomato fruits: A factorial combination of four levels of Neem plant extract (control, 15%, 20% and 25%) and four levels of beeswax coating (control, 3%, 6% and 9%) storage treatments with three replications were applied on fully matured green tomatoes in the study. The treatments were arranged in a randomized complete block design. A total quantity of 432 kg tomato fruits was used for the study, where each treatment combination had 27 kg fruits which were subdivided into three lots (9 kg of tomato fruits for each replication). For each treatment combination, tomato fruits were dipped in the Neem leaf extract solution for five minutes and surface air dried, then after the fruits was treated with the beeswax coating material. Untreated tomato fruits were used as a control. The fruits were then stored at ambient storage condition for physicochemical analysis and shelf life determination at four days interval during 36 days of storage period. The average storage room air temperature and relative humidity varied from 15.2 ºC to 20.4 ºC and 55.53% to 69.46% RH during 36 days of storage period at Haramaya University from February to April 2020.

Data collection: On each sampling date, a sample of 1 kg tomato was randomly taken from each replication in the treatment for quality analysis. Data were recorded on 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, 32, and 36 days after storage. Data on physiological loss in weight, chemical compositions (total soluble solids (TSS), pH, titratable acidity (TA), and ascorbic acid (AA)), decay (%), percentage marketability, and shelf life were assessed at an interval of four days during 36 days of storage period under ambient conditions.