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Data from: Sequential divergence and the multiplicative origin of community diversity

Citation

Hood, Glen R. et al. (2016), Data from: Sequential divergence and the multiplicative origin of community diversity, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.5n72m

Abstract

Understanding how new life forms originate is a central question in biology. Population divergence is usually studied with respect to how single lineages diverge into daughter taxa. However, populations may not always differentiate in isolation; divergence of one taxon could create new niche opportunities in higher trophic levels, leading to the sequential origin of many new taxa. Here, we show that this may be occurring for three species of parasitoid wasps attacking Rhagoletis fruit flies. As flies shift and adapt to new host plants, wasps follow suit and diverge in kind, resulting in a multiplicative increase of diversity as the effects of ecologically based divergent selection cascade through the ecosystem. Biodiversity therefore may potentially beget increasing levels of biodiversity.

Usage Notes

Location

Midwestern and Northeastern United States