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Data from: Undergraduate ultrasound education at German-speaking medical faculties: a survey

Citation

Wolf, Robert; Geuthel, Nicole; Gnatzy, Franziska; Rotzoll, Daisy (2019), Data from: Undergraduate ultrasound education at German-speaking medical faculties: a survey, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.5rk56gg

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was twofold: to assess the status of undergraduate medical ultrasound (US) education in the German-speaking area and to suggest a possible framework for a longitudinal undergraduate medical US curriculum based on the study results and a literature review. Methods: The survey included 44 medical faculties in the German-speaking area: 37 in Germany, four in Austria and three in German-speaking Switzerland. A standardized questionnaire focused on the following aspects of undergraduate medical US education: general information, organization, resources, assessment methods and evaluation. Results: Data from 28 medical faculties were analysed. 26 out of 28 medical faculties offered US courses, 21 offered compulsory as well as elective courses, four offered compulsory and one elective courses only. 27 medical faculties supported US skills implementation. Abdominal US (n=25) was most common in teaching basic US skills. A learning objective catalogue was provided at 15 medical faculties. At 22 medical faculties, medical specialists were involved in undergraduate medical US education. 24 out of 26 medical faculties thought that peer-teaching is important to convey US skills. Medical faculties used the following methods to assess US skills: objective structured clinical examination (OSCE, n=7), non-standardized practical exams (n=4), non-standardized combined oral-practical exams (n=2) or direct observation of procedural skills (DOPS, n=1). 25 out of 26 medical faculties evaluated their US courses and 19 made suggestions for improvements in undergraduate medical US education. Conclusion: Medical faculty members in the German-speaking area have recognized the relevance of undergraduate medical US education. So far, courses are offered heterogeneously with rather short hands-on scanning time and high student-instructor ratio. Based on the results of this study and a literature review we suggest a possible framework and milestones on the way to a longitudinal undergraduate medical US curriculum.

Usage Notes

Location

Austria
Switzerland
Germany