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Data from: Consequences of multiple inflorescences and clonality for pollinator behavior and plant mating

Citation

Liao, Wan-Jin; Harder, Lawrence D. (2014), Data from: Consequences of multiple inflorescences and clonality for pollinator behavior and plant mating, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.5s63b

Abstract

Angiosperms engage in distributed reproduction, producing sex organs in multiple flowers on one or more inflorescences, including on different physical individuals of clonal plants. We investigated the effects of alternative deployments of artificial flowers for pollinator behavior and simulated pollen dispersal. Plants presented 18 flowers on either one inflorescence (1-I plants) or three inflorescences (3-I plants) spaced either closely or widely. Bees often skipped inflorescences on 3-I plants, visiting an average of 1.5 fewer flowers overall than on 1-I plants. In simulations with all flowers receiving and donating pollen, this behavior caused 7% less geitonogamy for 3-I plants, contradicting a common supposition that clonality increases geitonogamy. Bees generally moved upward within inflorescences and downward between inflorescences. Consequently, in simulations, segregation of pollen receipt to lower flowers and pollen donation to upper flowers reduced self-pollination and enhanced pollen export much more for 1-I plants. Nectar volume per flower had little relevant influence on bee behavior. The observed bee responses and simulated mating results suggest that production of multiple inflorescences and clonality promote pollination quality when flowers simultaneously receive and donate pollen, whereas a single large inflorescence is advantageous when segregation of sex roles among flowers reduces geitonogamy effectively.

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