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Architectural effects regulate resource allocation within the inflorescences with nonlinear blooming patterns

Citation

Wang, Hao et al. (2022), Architectural effects regulate resource allocation within the inflorescences with nonlinear blooming patterns, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.5tb2rbp67

Abstract

These data were generated to investigate the resource allocation pattern within the inflorescence of Salvia przewalskii, a perennial herb with 4-ouvle ovary flowers and flowering sequence-floral position decoupled inflorescences. Spatial and temporal resource allocations within inflorescences have been well-studied in many plants based on flowering sequence or floral position. However, there have been few attempts to investigate architectural effects and resource competition in species where the blooming pattern does not follow a linear positional pattern within the inflorescence. Moreover, most flowering plants show female-biased sex allocation in early or basal flowers, but it is unclear in species with inherent and changeless ovule production. The data demonstrated that pollen production and dry mass deceased from bottom to top flowers but didn’t significantly differ following flowering sequence, resulting in male-biased sex allocation in basal flowers. The seed production, fruit set, bud developmental exhibited significant declining trends from proximal to distal positions regardless of the thinning and pollen treatments. Meanwhile, the seed production, fruit set, bud developmental success did not significant difference when thinning conducted according to flowering sequence. Thus, architectural effects plays a crucial role in resource allocation within decoupled flowering inflorescences. Moreover, the inherent floral traits, such as changeless ovule production, may modify architectural effects on sex allocation. 

Methods

All the data were collected from a natural population near the Shangri-La Alpine Botanical Garden, Yunnan Province, SW China (27°54′N, 99°38′E, 3300-3350 m a.s.l), and carried out between July and August in six consecutive flowering seasons from 2016 to 2021. The pollen and ovule number were counted in the lab with a microscope. The flower number and flower longevity per flower were recorded from several plants in a natural population. The flower length were measured by digital calipers in each inflorescence. The dry biomass per flower was weighed to the nearest 0.01 mg after dried at 80°C (24 h). In addition, all fruits per inflorescence were collected at the end of the fruiting season (~30 days after flower wilting), the seed production, fruit set, and bud developmental success per position or blooming stage were counted at lab.

Funding

National Natural Science Foundation of China, Award: 31760104

National Natural Science Foundation of China, Award: 31960349