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Data from: Feedback between environment and traits under selection in a seasonal environment: consequences for experimental evolution

Citation

Collot, Dorian et al. (2018), Data from: Feedback between environment and traits under selection in a seasonal environment: consequences for experimental evolution, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.5vn65dh

Abstract

Batch cultures are frequently used in experimental evolution. Even though they are generally considered to simply drive a growth rate increase, traits evolution can be more complex. Indeed, recurrent batches form a seasonal environment as different phases repeat periodically and different traits can be under selection in the different seasons. Moreover, during culture the impact of organisms on the environment is important since the system is closed. Thus, the study of adaptation should take into account the environment and eco-evolutionary feedbacks. Using the data of an experimental evolution on yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we develop a mathematical model to understand which traits are under selection, and what is the role of the environment for selection in a batch culture. We show that two kinds of traits are under selection in seasonal environments: life-history traits, related to growth and mortality, and transition traits, related to the ability to maintain high growth rate when the environment changes. The impact of environmental conditions can be summarized by the length of the different seasons which weight the importance of selection on each trait: the longer a season is, the higher is selection on the associated traits. Since phenotypes drive the length of each season, eco-evolutionary feedbacks emerge. Such feedbacks are known to promote coexistence between different species or strains. Our results show that the design of the batch in an experimental evolution can affect which traits are most selected because of these feedbacks.

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