Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Diversity and conservation of saproxylic beetles in 42 European tree species: an experimental approach using early successional stages of branches

Citation

Vogel, Sebastian et al. (2021), Diversity and conservation of saproxylic beetles in 42 European tree species: an experimental approach using early successional stages of branches, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.5x69p8d1b

Abstract

Correction: In the original version of this dataset, the non‐native Prunus serotina was incorrectly interchanged with the native Prunus padus, and eight individuals of saproxylic beetles were incorrectly removed from the data when splitting beetles in saproxylic and non‐saproxylic species. The correct tree species is Prunus serotina, and results refer to a total of 113 species of saproxylic beetles and 30,550 individuals.

1. Tree species diversity is important to maintain saproxylic beetle diversity in managed forests. However, knowledge about the conservational importance of single tree species and implications for forest management and conservation practices are lacking.

2. We exposed freshly cut branch-bundles of 42 tree species, representing tree species native and non-native to Europe, under sun-exposed and shaded conditions for one year. Afterwards, communities of saproxylic beetles were reared ex-situ for two years. We tested for the impact of tree species and sun exposure on alpha-, beta-, and gamma diversity as well as composition of saproxylic beetle communities.

3. Tree species had a lower impact on saproxylic beetle communities compared to sun exposure. The diversity of saproxylic beetles varied strongly among tree species, with highest alpha- and gamma-diversity found in Quercus petraea. Red-listed saproxylic beetle species occurred ubiquitously among tree species. We found distinct differences in the community composition of broadleaved and coniferous tree species, native and non-native tree species as well as sun-exposed and shaded deadwood.

4. Our study enhances the understanding of the importance of previously understudied and non-native tree species for the diversity of saproxylic beetles. To improve conservation practices for saproxylic beetles and especially red-listed species, we suggest a stronger incorporation of tree species diversity and sun exposure into forest management strategies, including the enrichment of deadwood from native tree species and with a specific focus on locally rare or silvicultural less important tree species.

Methods

Branch-bundles of 42 tree species were established for one year under two different conditions of sun exposure and saproxylic beetles were afterwards reared for the two subsequent years.

Funding

Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt, Award: 20016/466