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Data from: Male-limited secondary sexual trait interacts with environment in determining female fitness

Citation

Skwierzyńska, Anna M.; Radwan, Jacek; Plesnar-Bielak, Agata (2018), Data from: Male-limited secondary sexual trait interacts with environment in determining female fitness, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.62fc1m4

Abstract

Selection for secondary sexual traits (SSTs) elaboration may increase intralocus sexual conflict over the optimal values of traits expressed from shared genomes. This conflict can reduce female fitness, and the resulting gender load can be exacerbated by environmental stress, with consequences for a population’s ability to adapt to novel environments. However, how the evolution of SSTs interacts with environment in determining female fitness is not well understood. Here, we investigated this question using replicate lines of bulb mites selected for increased or decreased prevalence of a male SST—thickened legs used as weapons. The fitness of females from these lines was measured at a temperature to which the mites were adapted (24°C), as well as at two novel temperatures: 18°C and 28°C. We found the prevalence of the SST interacted with temperature in determining female fecundity. At 28°C, females from populations with high SST prevalence were less fecund than females from populations in which the SST was rare, but the reverse was true at 18°C. Thus, a novel environment does not universally depress female fitness more in populations with a high degree of sexually selected dimorphism. We discuss possible consequences of the interaction we detected for adaptation to novel environments.

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: no