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Data from: Modifiable patient-related barriers and their association with breast cancer detection practices among Ugandan women without a diagnosis of breast cancer

Citation

Sharp, Jake W. et al. (2019), Data from: Modifiable patient-related barriers and their association with breast cancer detection practices among Ugandan women without a diagnosis of breast cancer, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.6363669

Abstract

Most women with breast cancer in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are diagnosed with late-staged disease. The current study assesses patient-related barriers among women from a general SSA population to better understand how patient-related barriers contribute to diagnostic delays. Using convenience-based sampling, 401 Ugandan women without breast cancer were surveyed to determine how prior participation in cancer detection practices correlate with patient-related barriers to prompt diagnosis. In a predominantly poor (76%) and rural population (75%), the median age of the participants was 38. Of the women surveyed, 155 (46%) had prior exposure to breast cancer education, 92 (27%) performed breast self-examination (BSE) and 68 (20%) had undergone a recent clinical breast examination (CBE), breast ultrasound or breast biopsy. The most commonly identified barriers to prompt diagnosis were knowledge deficits regarding early diagnosis (79%), economic barriers to accessing care (68%), fear (37%) and poor social support (24%). However, only women who reported knowledge deficits – a modifiable barrier – were less likely to participate in cancer detection practices (p<0.05). Women in urban and rural areas were similarly likely to report economic barriers, knowledge deficits and/or poor social support, but rural women were less likely than urban women to have received breast cancer education and/or perform BSE (p<0.001). Women who have had prior breast cancer education (p<0.001) and/or who perform BSE (p=0.02) were more likely to know where she can go to receive a diagnostic breast evaluation. These findings suggest that SSA countries developing early breast cancer detection programs should specifically address modifiable knowledge deficits among women less likely to achieve a diagnostic work-up to reduce diagnostic delays and improve breast cancer outcomes.

Usage Notes

Location

Uganda