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Data from: Priority effects are weakened by a short, but not long, history of sympatric evolution

Citation

Zee, Peter C.; Fukami, Tadashi (2018), Data from: Priority effects are weakened by a short, but not long, history of sympatric evolution, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.63t3d

Abstract

Priority effects, or the effects of species arrival history on local species abundances, have been documented in a range of taxa. However, factors determining the extent to which priority effects affect community assembly remain unclear. Using laboratory populations of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens, we examined whether shared evolutionary history affected the strength of priority effects. We hypothesized that sympatric evolution of populations belonging to the same guild would lead to niche differentiation, resulting in phenotypic complementarity that weakens priority effects. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that priority effects tended to be weaker in sympatrically evolved pairs of immigrating populations than in allopatrically evolved pairs. Furthermore, priority effects were weaker under higher phenotypic complementarity. However, these patterns were observed only in populations with a relatively short history of sympatric evolution, and disappeared when populations had evolved together for a long time. Together, our results suggest that the evolutionary history of organismal traits may dictate the strength of priority effects and, consequently, the extent of historical contingency in the assembly of ecological communities.

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: 1202813