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Data from: Quantitative analysis of the complete larval settlement process confirms Crisp’s model of surface selectivity by barnacles

Citation

Aldred, Nick; Alsaab, Ahmad; Clare, Anthony S. (2018), Data from: Quantitative analysis of the complete larval settlement process confirms Crisp’s model of surface selectivity by barnacles, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.64486

Abstract

For barnacle cypris larvae at the point of settlement, selection of an appropriate surface is critical. Since post-settlement relocation is usually impossible, barnacles have evolved finely-tuned surface sensing capabilities to identify suitable substrata, and a temporary adhesion system for extensive surface exploration. The pattern of exploratory behaviour appears complex and may last for several hours, imposing significant barriers to quantitative measurement. Here, we employ a novel tracking system that enables simultaneous analysis of the larval body movement of multiple individuals over their entire planktonic phase. For the first time, we describe quantitatively the complete settlement process of cyprids as they explore and select surfaces for attachment. We confirm the ‘classic’ behaviours of wide searching, close searching and inspection that comprise a model originally proposed by Prof. Dennis Crisp FRS. Moreover, a short-term assay of cyprid body movement has identified inspection behaviour as the best indicator of propensity to settle, with more inspection-related movements occurring in conditions that also promote higher settlement. More than half-century after the model was first proposed by Crisp, there exists a precise method for quantifying cyprid settlement behaviour in wide-ranging investigations of barnacle ecology and applied studies of fouling management.

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