Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Reverse audience effects on helping in cooperatively breeding marmoset monkeys

Citation

Brügger, Rahel K.; Kappeler-Schmalzriedt, Theresa; Burkart, Judith M. (2018), Data from: Reverse audience effects on helping in cooperatively breeding marmoset monkeys, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.6455c

Abstract

Cooperatively breeding common marmosets show substantial variation in the amount of help they provide. Pay-to-stay and social prestige models of helping attribute this variation to audience effects, i.e. that individuals help more if group members can witness their interactions with immatures, whereas models of kin selection, group augmentation, or ones stressing the need to gain parenting experience do not predict any audience effects. We quantified the readiness of adult marmosets to share food in the presence or absence of other group members. Contrary to both predictions we found a reverse audience effect on food sharing behaviour: marmosets would systematically share more food with immatures when no audience was present. Thus, helping in common marmosets, at least in related family groups, does not support the pay-to-stay or the social prestige model, and helpers do not take advantage of the opportunity to engage in reputation management. Rather, the results appear to reflect a genuine concern for the immatures' wellbeing, which seems particularly strong when solely responsible for the immatures.

Usage Notes