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Data from: The effects of genotype × phenotype interactions on transcriptional response to silver nanoparticle toxicity in organotypic cultures of murine tracheal epithelial cells

Citation

Nicholas, Tyler et al. (2021), Data from: The effects of genotype × phenotype interactions on transcriptional response to silver nanoparticle toxicity in organotypic cultures of murine tracheal epithelial cells, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.65v002b

Abstract

The airway epithelium is critical for maintaining innate and adaptive immune responses, and occupational exposures that disrupt its immune homeostasis may initiate and amplify airway inflammation. In our previous study, we demonstrated that silver nanoparticles (AgNP), which are engineered nanomaterials used in multiple applications but primarily in the manufacturing of many antimicrobial products, induce toxicity in organotypic cultures derived from murine tracheal epithelial cells (MTEC), and those differentiated toward a “Type 2 [T2]-Skewed” phenotype experienced an increased sensitivity to AgNP toxicity, suggesting that asthmatics could be a sensitive population to AgNP exposures in occupational settings. However, the mechanistic basis for this genotype × phenotype interaction (G×P) has yet to be defined. In the present study, we conducted transcriptional profiling using RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) to predict the enrichment of specific canonical pathways and upstream transcriptional regulators to assist in defining a mechanistic basis for G×P effects on AgNP toxicity. Organotypic cultures were derived from MTEC across two genetically inbred mouse strains (A/J and C57BL/6J mice), two phenotypes (“Normal” and “T2-Skewed”), and one AgNP exposure (an acute 24 h exposure) to characterize G×P effects on transcriptional response to AgNP toxicity. The “T2-Skewed” phenotype was marked by increased pro-inflammatory T17 responses to AgNP toxicity, which are significant predictors of neutrophilic/difficult-to-control asthma and suggests that asthmatics could be a sensitive population to AgNP exposures in occupational settings. This study highlights the importance of considering G×P effects when identifying these sensitive populations, whose underlying genetics or diseases could directly modify their response to AgNP exposures.

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