Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: High genetic diversity in the offshore island populations of the tephritid fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis

Citation

Yi, Chunyan; Zheng, Chunyan; Zeng, Ling; Xu, Yijuan (2016), Data from: High genetic diversity in the offshore island populations of the tephritid fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.666sn

Abstract

Background: Geographic isolation is an important factor that limit species dispersal and thereby affects genetic diversity. Because islands are often small and surrounded by a natural water barrier to dispersal, they generally form discrete isolated habitats. Therefore, islands may play a key role in the distribution of the genetic diversity of insects, including flies. Results: To characterize the genetic structure of island populations of Bactrocera dorsalis, we analyzed a dataset containing both microsatellite and mtDNA loci of B. dorsalis samples collected from six offshore islands in Southern China. The microsatellite data revealed a high level of genetic diversity among these six island populations based on observed heterozygosity (Ho), expected heterozygosity (HE), Nei’s standard genetic distance (D), genetic identity (I) and the percentage of polymorphic loci (PIC). These island populations had low F ST values (F ST = 0.04161), and only 4.16 % of the total genetic variation in the species was found on these islands, as determined by an analysis of molecular variance. Based on the mtDNA COI data, high nucleotide diversity (0.9655) and haplotype diversity (0.00680) were observed in all six island populations. F-statistics showed that the six island populations exhibited low or medium levels of genetic differentiation among some island populations. To investigate the population differentiation between the sampled locations, a factorial correspondence analysis and both the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean and Bayesian clustering methods were used to analyze the microsatellite data. The results showed that Hebao Island, Weizhou Island and Dong’ao Island were grouped together in one clade. Another clade consisted of Shangchuan Island and Naozhou Island, and a final, separate clade contained only the Wailingding Island population. Phylogenetic analysis of the mtDNA COI sequences revealed that the populations on each of these six islands were closely related to different populations on mainland China. Conclusions: Our study suggests that these island populations have high genetic diversity, experience frequent gene flow and exhibit low or medium levels of genetic differentiation among some island populations. Therefore, the geographic isolation of the six islands does not appear to be a major dispersal barrier to B. dorsalis. Such knowledge is helpful for a better understanding of evolutionary processes of the species of island populations.

Usage Notes