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Data from: Allocation and functional traits of trees and saplings of Bornean tree species growing under contrasting soil nutrient availabilities

Cite this dataset

Aoyagi, Ryota; Imai, Nobuo; Kitayama, Kanehiro (2024). Data from: Allocation and functional traits of trees and saplings of Bornean tree species growing under contrasting soil nutrient availabilities [Dataset]. Dryad. https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.66t1g1k55

Abstract

The files hold the data of allocation and traits of adult trees ((i) the relationship between tree height and diameter at breast height, (ii) nutrient concentration in green leaves, senescent leaves, wood, and (iii) wood density) and saplings ((i) biomass allocation to leaves, stem, coarse roots, and fine roots, (ii) nutrient concentration in levees, senescent leaves, stem, and roots, and (iii) leaf mass per area) in Bornean tropical tree species growing under contrasting soil nutrient availabilities.

Study site includes the Tawau Hills Park (4°27′N, 117°56′E, ca. 300 m asl), the Deramakot Forest Reserve (5°22′N, 117°25′E, ca. 250 m asl), and Nabawan (5°05′N, 116°29′E, ca. 500 m asl), Sabah, Malaysia. Vegetation of Tawau and Deramakot is a mixed dipterocarp forest, whereas that of Nabawan is a tropical heath forest. These sites considerably differ in soil characteristics. The forests in the Tawau Hills Park lie on the andesitic volcanic ash derived from the past eruptions ca. 27000 years ago by Mt. Magdalena, Mt. Lucia, and Mt. Maria. On the other hand, soils in the Deramakot Forest Reserve are derived from tertiary sedimentary rocks. Soils of Nabawan are classified as white sand podosol.

README: Allocation and functional traits of trees and saplings of Bornean tree species growing under contrasting soil nutrient availabilities

https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.66t1g1k55

The files hold the data of allocation and traits of adult trees ((i) the relationship between tree height and diameter at breast height, (ii) nutrient concentration in green leaves, senescent leaves, wood, and (iii) wood density) and saplings ((i) biomass allocation to leaves, stem, coarse roots, and fine roots, (ii) nutrient concentration in levees, senescent leaves, stem, and roots, and (iii) leaf mass per area) in Bornean tropical tree species growing under contrasting soil nutrient availabilities.

Study site includes the Tawau Hills Park (4°27′N, 117°56′E, ca. 300 m asl), the Deramakot Forest Reserve (5°22′N, 117°25′E, ca. 250 m asl), and Nabawan (5°05′N, 116°29′E, ca. 500 m asl), Sabah, Malaysia. Vegetation of Tawau and Deramakot is a mixed dipterocarp forest, whereas that of Nabawan is a tropical heath forest. These sites considerably differ in soil characteristics. The forests in the Tawau Hills Park lie on the andesitic volcanic ash derived from the past eruptions ca. 27000 years ago by Mt. Magdalena, Mt. Lucia, and Mt. Maria. On the other hand, soils in the Deramakot Forest Reserve are derived from tertiary sedimentary rocks. Soils of Nabawan are classified as white sand podosol. Please see the related articles for the further description of the study sites.

Common variable names:

DataID: ID for each data.

PlantID: Tag number to identify the individuals for which the sample was collected.

Site: Places where the sample was collected. Three sites in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo were included.

• Tawau Hills Park (4°27′N, 117°56′E, ca. 300 m asl)

• Deramakot Forest Reserve (5°22′N, 117°25′E, ca. 250 m asl)

• Nabawan (5°05′N, 116°29′E, ca. 500 m asl)

Species: Species name.

DBH: Diameter at breast height(cm)

Variable names in Data_tree_height.csv and the method of data collection

Height: Tree height (m)

Tree height was measured using a digital hypsometer (Vertex III, Haglöf, Sweden). Mean of the measurements from two directions was used for tree height for each individual to minimize the artificial errors.

Variable names in Data_tree_element.csv and the method of data collection

Organ: Organs for which nutrient concentration was determined (Leaf, senescent leaf or wood).

N: Nitrogen concentration (mg g–1)

C: Carbon concentration (mg g–1)

Mg: Magnesium concentration (mg g–1)

P: Phosphorus concentration (mg g–1)

K: Potassium concentration (mg g–1)

Ca: Calcium concentration (mg g–1)

Canopy leaf and stem wood samples were collected from individuals with varying DBH (4–10 individuals for each tree species). We chose individuals with at least partly exposed crowns to minimize the potential effects of light availability on nutrient concentrations in the plant organs. ). Five-cm (for trees < 20 cm DBH) or 10-cm (for trees ≥ 20 cm DBH) wood cores were sampled from the outermost section. We collected at least two samples of wood per individual tree, and combined samples by individual tree We collected senescent leaves on the ground around three different large individuals at least 50 m apart from each other and used the mean values of nutrient concentrations. Only senescent leaves with flesh cross-sections of the petiole were used for the analysis.

Samples were oven-dried at 60 °C for 4 days and finely ground. C and N concentrations of each powdered plant sample were determined by dry combustion with an NC analyzer (JM1000CN). To determine Mg, P, K and Ca concentrations, each sample was digested on a block digester with concentrated H2SO4 and H2O2. Elemental concentrations in the solutions were determined using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICPS-7510, Shimadzu Co., Kyoto, Japan).

Variable names in Data_wood_density.csv and the method of data collection

Replicate: Replicate number for an individual.

Diameter of core: Diameter of wood core samples (cm).

Length: Length of wood core samples (cm).

Water: Water content of wood core samples (unitless).

WD: Wood density of wood core samples (unitless).

See the above description for the method to collect wood samples for “Data_adult_element_20220913.csv”.

Variable names in Data_sapling_mass.csv and the method of data collection

Light: Light condition (Global site factor) determined by hemispherical photographs.

DGH: Diameter at ground height (mm).

M_total: Total weight of the sapling (g).

M_stem: Dry weight of stem (g).

M_leaf: Dry weight of leaves (g).

M_root_total: Dry weight of roots (g).

M_mainroot: Dry weight of main roots (g).

M_fineroot: Dry weight of fine roots (g).

Over 20 saplings (range 21–31) were harvested from the study species after DGH, and light conditions were measured. Samples were oven-dried by at 60 °C for 4 days. Those samples were divided into stem, leaves, main roots, and fine-roots (roots of < 2-mm diamter), and weighted separately.

Variable names in Data_sapling_ element.csv and the method of data collection

Organ: Organs for which nutrient concentration was determined (Leaf, senescent leaf, stem, or root).

N: Nitrogen concentration (mg g–1).

C: Carbon concentration (mg g–1).

Mg: Magnesium concentration (mg g–1).

P: Phosphorus concentration (mg g–1).

K: Potassium concentration (mg g–1).

Ca: Calcium concentration (mg g–1).

Saplings growing under gap conditions (site factor ≥12%) were selected, and nutrient concentrations of leaf, stem and roots were determined. Senescent leaves were collected from the saplings under gap conditions. Samples were oven-dried at 60 °C for 4 days and finely ground. C and N concentrations of each powdered plant sample were determined by dry combustion with an NC analyzer (JM1000CN). To determine Mg, P, K and Ca concentrations, each sample was digested on a block digester with concentrated H2SO4 and H2O2. Elemental concentrations in the solutions were determined using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICPS-7510, Shimadzu Co., Kyoto, Japan).

Variable names in Data_sapling_lma.csv and the method of data collection

Weight: Dry weight of leaves (mg).

Area: Leaf area (cm2).

LMA: Leaf mass per area (g m–2).

To calculate LMA of saplings, at least four saplings under gap conditions was chosen for each species and leaf areas of over three fully expanding leaves were determined by analyzing scanned images with the software ImageJ. Canopy leaf area was calculated by multiplying total leaf mass by inversed LMA.

Methods

Please see the readme file and the related articles for the data collection procedures.

 Please see the related articles for a further description of the study sites.

R. Aoyagi, K. Kitayama, Journal of Tropical Ecology. 31, 231–242 (2015).
R. Aoyagi, K. Kitayama, Journal of Plant Research. 129, 675–684 (2016).

 

 

Funding

Kyoto University, Award: Hakubi project

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Award: Fellowship for Japanese Young Scientists 19J01435

Ministry of the Environment, Award: D-1006 and 1-1403

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Award: 22255002