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Data from: Repeated evolution of amphibious behavior in fish and its implications for the colonization of novel environments

Citation

Ord, Terry J.; Cooke, Georgina M. (2016), Data from: Repeated evolution of amphibious behavior in fish and its implications for the colonization of novel environments, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.67g0t

Abstract

We know little about on how frequently transitions into new habitats occur, especially the colonization of novel environments that are the most likely to instigate adaptive evolution. One of the most extreme ecological transitions has been the shift in habitat associated with the move from water to land by amphibious fish. We provide the first phylogenetic investigation of these transitions for living fish. Thirty-three families have species reported to be amphibious and these are likely independent evolutionary origins of fish emerging onto land. Phylogenetic reconstructions of closely related taxa within one of these families, the Blenniidae, inferred as many as seven convergences on a highly amphibious lifestyle. Taken together, there appear to be few constraints on fish emerging onto land given amphibious behavior has evolved repeatedly many times across ecologically diverse families. The colonization of novel habitats by other taxa resulting in less dramatic changes in environment should be equally, if not, more frequent in nature, providing an important prerequisite for subsequent adaptive differentiation.

Usage Notes

Location

Rarotonga
Japan
Taiwan
Seychelles
Guam
Mauritius
French Polynesia