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Data from: Symmetrical discrimination despite weak song differentiation in two Suboscine sister species

Citation

Macedo, Gabriel; Silva, Marco; Amaral, Fábio; Maldonado-Coelho, Marcos (2019), Data from: Symmetrical discrimination despite weak song differentiation in two Suboscine sister species, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.68ct8kc

Abstract

Song mediates territorial competition and mate choice in birds and population divergence in this signal can have important evolutionary consequences. For example, divergent songs can act in specific recognition and limit gene flow and, hence, have a fundamental role on the origin and/or integrity of evolutionary lineages. Specially interesting systems to test the role of song in specific recognition are species pairs that present small structural differences in this signal. Here we perform song play-back experiments on males of a long-diverged sister pair of Neotropical Suboscine species, the Squamate Antbird (Myrmoderus squamosus) and the White-bibbed Antbird (M. loricatus), which occur in parapatry in the Atlantic Forest and that overlap extensively in song variation. Previous evidence indicates that genetic introgression between these species is either absent or negligible, suggesting that vocal discrimination or other mechanisms function as effective barriers to gene flow. Our results show that responses to heterospecific songs were symmetrical and intermediary compared to responses to conspecific songs in both species. A stronger response to conspecific territorial songs suggests that conspecific individuals pose greater competitive threat than heterospecifics. An important implication of our study is that even small song differences can play an important role in specific recognition.

Usage Notes

Location

Brazilian Atlantic Forest
Rio de Janeiro
Sao Paulo