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Data from: Wind pollination over 70 years reduces the negative genetic effects of severe forest fragmentation in the tropical oak Quercus bambusifolia

Citation

Zeng, Xueqin; Fischer, Gunter (2019), Data from: Wind pollination over 70 years reduces the negative genetic effects of severe forest fragmentation in the tropical oak Quercus bambusifolia, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.6g97722

Abstract

Whether wind pollination in trees can offset the negative genetic consequences of anthropogenic forest fragmentation is not clearly established. To answer this question, we examined the demographic genetics of Quercus bambusifolia over a 70-year recovery period in highly fragmented forests in Hong Kong. We sampled 1138 individuals from 37 locations, and genetically analysed the chronosequence through the classification of tree diameters from the same populations using 13 microsatellite markers. Our study reveals that severe fragmentation caused a significant genetic bottleneck with very few remaining but genetically diverse individuals. We observed an enhanced genetic diversity during demographic recovery. We found full-sibs within populations and half-sibs across the study range. This reflects a limited seed dispersal and extensive pollen flow. Despite reduced genetic structure both among and within populations, overall a strong persisting genetic differenti ation (FST = 0.240, P < 0.01) and significant small-scale spatial genetic structure (F(1) = 0.13, Sp = 0.024, P < 0.01) were observed. Existing bottlenecks and low effective population sizes within the temporal chronosequence suggest that the long-term effect of severe fragmentation cannot be entirely eliminated by wind pollination with demographic recovery in the absence of effective seed dispersal. Our results lead to recommendations for forest management.

Usage Notes

Location

Hong Kong SAR