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Genetic structure in hybrids and progenitors provides insight into processes underlying an invasive cattail (Typha x glauca) hybrid zone

Citation

Pieper, Sara; Dorken, Marcel; Freeland, Joanna (2020), Genetic structure in hybrids and progenitors provides insight into processes underlying an invasive cattail (Typha x glauca) hybrid zone, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.6hdr7sqx5

Abstract

Traditional models of hybrid zones have assumed relatively low hybrid fitness, and thus focussed more on interspecific gene flow than on hybrid dispersal.  Therefore, when hybrids have high fitness and the potential for autonomous dispersal, we have limited understanding of whether hybrid dispersal or repeated local hybrid formation is more important for maintaining hybrid zones.  The invasive hybrid cattail Typha × glauca occupies an extensive hybrid zone in northeastern North America where it is sympatric with its progenitors T. latifolia and T. angustifolia. We characterized genetic diversity and genetic structure of the three taxa across a broad spatial scale, and tested the hypothesis that the hybrid shows stronger evidence of gene flow than its progenitor species, particularly among disturbed sites (ditches) compared to established wetlands. Support for this hypothesis would suggest that dispersal, rather than repeated local formation, is more important in maintaining hybrid zones. Within each taxon, genetic differentiation among ditches was comparable to that among wetlands, although clonal richness was consistently greater in ditches suggesting more frequent seed establishment. Genetic structure across sites was more pronounced in the hybrid compared to either progenitor species.  Overall, our data reflect relatively low gene flow in hybrids, and suggest that hybrids are more likely to be created in situ than to be introduced from other sites. Despite the high fitness of invasive T. × glauca and its potential for autonomy, local processes appear more important than dispersal in maintaining this hybrid zone.

Methods

Data were collected from 22 stands along approximately 1700 km from Cheboygan, MI to Halifax, NS in June 2013. In each of 11 regions along this distance twos (one wetland and one ditch) were sampled. Approximately 80 Typha ramets (shoots) were sampled per site. Ramets were every 3 m along transects spaced 3 m apart. Leaf tissue was collected from each sampled plant for genotyping.

Ramets were genotyped at 7 microsatellite loci (see manuscript for details). Ramets from the same site that had identical multilocus genotypes were assigned to the same genet (multilocus genotype). The data here are genet-level data from the sties that were used in analyses in the associated manuscript. Only sites with > 9 genets were used in analyses. 

Funding

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), Postgraduate Scholarship

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Award: RGPIN 355954-2013

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Award: RGPIN 229737-2012